Print
Parent Category: Indian Buddhism
Category: Indian Mahayana
Hits: 1359

The Noble Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra

by Prajñāsamudra and Śāntideva

We dedicate the merit of this work to the perfect flourishing of the teachings, teachers, and students. In the words of the great masters of the past:

May the teachers appear in the world,
May the teachings shine like the rays of the sun, May the holders of the teachings live in harmony and flourish.
Thus may there be the auspiciousness for the teachings to remain!

Translated and published by

Lhasey Lotsawa Translations & Publications

Lhasey Lotsawa Translations & Publications P.O. Box 19704
Kathmandu
Nepal

www.lhaseylotsawa.org

© Copyright 2015 by Chokgyur Lingpa Foundation.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Contents

Introduction by Kyabgön Phakchok Rinpoche 1 The Noble Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra 4

A Commentary on
the Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra
by Prajñāsamudra 10

A Commentary on
the Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra
by Śāntideva 36

The Noble Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra arranged for chanting 77

Introduction

By Kyabgön Phakchok Rinpoche

The Buddha’s teachings are both vast and profound— vast in the sense that they teach many different methods to enlightenment, and profound because of the depth of those teachings. But nevertheless, as the Buddha’s disciples we are sometimes unclear as to how we should practice this vast and profound dharma, which can seem confusing at first.

This short Mahāyāna sūtra, entitled The Noble Wisdom at the Time of Death, condenses the whole of the Buddha’s teachings into five essential points, which are presented in a pithy way that is easy to apply. These five points are:

· the view of emptiness,
· the
motivation of bodhicitta,
· the
meditation on profound emptiness,
· the
understanding of impermanence, which

encourages diligence on the path,
· the
fruition which manifests from that

understanding.

1

When I first read this sūtra I found it extremely helpful, as it dispelled many doubts that had
been lingering in my mind. It confirmed that the teachings on emptiness, non-referential meditation, impermanence and so forth really are the direct words of the Buddha and not just creations of people who appeared centuries later. Several years ago, thinking that this sūtra could likewise benefit others, I asked some of my dharma students to translate it for English- speaking students, together with its two commentaries that are found in the Tengyur (the collection of translated treatises).

It is my aspiration that all who encounter this book will recite and reflect upon this sūtra everyday.

If we can keep in mind and put into practice
the five points taught here (the unmistaken view, motivation, meditation, understanding, and fruition), then we can become good practitioners.

May all be auspicious!

2

The Sūtra

3

༄༅། །འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ ་མ ་ བ གས་ །།

་གར་ ད་ ། རྻ་ཨ་ ་ཡ་ ་ན་ ་མ་མ ་ ་ན་ ་ ། ད་ ད་ ། འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ་ ག་པ་ ན་ ་མ །

སངས་ ས་དང་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ཐམས་ཅད་ལ་ ག་འཚལ་ ། །

འ ་ ད་བདག་ ས་ ས་པ་ ས་ག ག་ན། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ག་ ན་ ་ ལ་ ་ཁང་བཟང་ན་བ གས་ ་འ ར་ཐམས་ཅད་ལ་ ས་ ན་པ་ དང་། ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ མས་དཔའ་ ན་ ་ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ས་ བ མ་ ན་འདས་ལ་ ག་འཚལ་ནས་འ ་ ད་ ས་ག ལ་ ། །བ མ་ ན་ འདས་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ནམ་འ ་ཁ་མ ་ མས་ ་ ར་བ ་བར་བག ། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་བཀའ་ ལ་པ། ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ་ ང་ བ་ མས་ དཔའ་ནམ་འ ་བ ་ ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་བ མ་པར་ ། ། ་ལ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ་ ས་ཐམས་ཅད་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ མ་པར་དག་པས་ན་ད ས་ ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ། ། ས་ཐམས་ཅད་ ང་ བ་ ་ མས་ ་འ ས་པས་ན་ ང་ ་ ན་ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ། ། ས་ཐམས་ཅད་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ ད་གསལ་བས་ན་ ་ད གས་པ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ། །ད ས་ ་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ ག་པས་ན་

4

The Noble
Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra

In the Indian language: Āryātyayajñānanāmamahāyān- asūtra.
In the Tibetan language: pakpa daka yeshe shyé jawa tekpa chenpo do.

In the English language: The Noble Mahāyāna Sūtra entitled Wisdom of the Time of Death.

Homage to all buddhas and bodhisattvas!

Thus I once heard. The Bhagavān was present in the palace of the king of the gods of Akaniṣṭa teaching the dharma to his retinue when the bodhisattva mahāsattva Ākāśagarbha prostrated to the Bhagavān and asked

the following question: “Bhagavān, how should a bodhisattva regard the mind at the time of death?”

The Bhagavān then replied: “Ākāśagarbha, at the moment of death, the bodhisattva should train in the wisdom of the time of death. The wisdom of the time of death consists of the following: Since all phenomena are naturally pure, cultivate well the notion of lack

of existence. Since all dharmas are contained within bodhicitta, cultivate well a mind of great compassion. Since all phenomena are naturally luminous, cultivate

5

་ལ་ཡང་ ་ཆགས་པ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ། ། མས་ གས་ ན་ ་ ས་ ན་པས་ན་སངས་ ས་གཞན་ ་ ་བཙལ་བ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་ བ མ་པར་ ། །བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ གས་ ་བཅད་ ་བཀའ་ ལ་པ།

ས་ མས་རང་བ ན་ མ་དག་པས། ། ད ས་ ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། ། ང་ བ་ མས་དང་རབ་ ན་པས། ། ང་ ་ ན་ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། ། ས་ མས་རང་བ ན་ ད་གསལ་བས། ། ད གས་པ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། ། ད ས་ ་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ ག་པས། ། ཆགས་པ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། ། མས་ ་ ་ ས་འ ང་བ ་ ། ། སངས་ ས་གཞན་ ་མ་ ལ་ ག །

བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ ་ ད་ ས་བཀའ་ ལ་པ་དང་། ང་ བ་ མས་ དཔའ་ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ་ལ་ གས་པ ་འ ར་འ ས་པ་ཐམས་ཅད་རབ་ ་ དགའ་མ ་ ་རངས་ནས། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ག ངས་པ་ལ་མ ན་ པར་བ ད་ ། །འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ་ ག་པ་ ན་ ་ མ ་ གས་ །། །།མ ་ལཾ།།

6

well a mind free of reference point. Since all entities are impermanent, cultivate well a state of mind that is not attached to anything at all. When the mind is realized, that itself is wisdom. Therefore, cultivate well the notion that buddha is not to be searched for elsewhere.” The Bhagavān then spoke the following verses:

“Since phenomena are by nature pure, Cultivate the notion of lack of existence. Since they are infused with bodhicitta, Cultivate a mind of great compassion. Since everything is naturally luminous, Cultivate a mind free of reference point. Since all entities are impermanent, Cultivate a state of mind that is free of

attachment.
Mind is the cause for the arising of wisdom; Don’t search for buddha elsewhere!”

The Bhagavān having said this, the bodhisattva Ākāśagarbha and all those gathered in the retinue rejoiced with delight and praised the Bhagavān’s teaching.

This completes the noble Mahāyāna Sūtra entitled Wisdom of the Time of Death. Auspiciousness!

7

8

The Commentaries

9

༄༅། །འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ་མ ་ མ་པར་ བཤད་པ་བ གས་ །།

་གར་ ད་ ། ་ཨ་ ་ ་ན་ ་ ་ ་ ་ན། ད་ ད་ ། འཕགས་ པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ་མ ་ མ་པར་བཤད་པ། དཔལ་ མ་པར་ ང་མཛད་ལ་ ག་འཚལ་ ། །མ་ ས་ ང་པ ་ མ་པ་ ད། ། ་བ་ བ ན་པས་ ང་མཛད་པ། ། མ་པར་ ང་མཛད་ གས་ ་ཅན། ། ངས་ ད་ གས་ ར་ ག་འཚལ་ ། ། ས་པ་ ན་ག ་མ ་ ་ ། ། མ་ པར་བཤད་པ་ཙམ་ ་ ། །མ་ ར་ ས་པ ་ལམ་འ ད་ མས། ། ལ་ འ ་ལ་ ་འ ག་པར་ག ས། །ད ས་འ ལ་ག ་ ན་ ད་ ་མ་བ ན་ན་ གས་པ་དང་ ན་པ་དག་འ ག་པར་ ་འ ར་བས་ ་བ ན་ ། འདའ་ ཀ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ་ ་བ ན་ག གས་པ་ མས་ ་ གས་ ་གསང་ བ ་མ ད་འ ་ ་བ ད་པར་ ། །

10

A Commentary on the Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra

By Prajñāsamudra

In the Indian language: Āryātyayajñānasūtravyākhyānam. In the Tibetan language: pakpa daka yeshe kyi do’i nampar shepa.
In the English language:
A Commentary on the Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra.

Homage to the glorious Vairocana!

The appearance of unborn emptiness, Illuminating the world with his births— To Vairocana the compassionate one, The sambhogakāya, I pay homage!

I will now compose a commentary
On a sūtra of the definitive meaning,
So, all you who wish to follow the unmistaken,

certain path,
Engage now in this text!

If the purpose, connection and so forth1 are not explained at the outset, the wise will not engage with the text; therefore I will now explain these things. “The wisdom of the time of death,” the secret treasury of the

11

་ ན་པ ་ ག་ ་ གས་ ་ ད་པར་ ད་པ ། ། ། ་བ ད་པས་ ་ ན་ ང་ ་ ད་པ་ ་ད ས་པ ། ། ་ ན་ ང་ ་ ད་པས་ མས་ གས་པ ་ ་ ས་སངས་ ས་ ད་ བ་པ་ ་ ་ད ས་པ་མཐར་ ན་ པ ། །འ ལ་བ་ ་ ་འ ང་བ ་ ར་ ་ ད་ གས་ལས་ ས་པར་ ། ། འ ་ ད་བདག་ ས་ ས་པ་ ས་ག ག་ན། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ག་ ན་ ་ ལ་ ་ཁང་བཟངས་ན་བ གས་ ། འ ར་ཐམས་ཅད་ལ་ ས་ ན་པ་དང་ ས་ ་བས་ ་ ན་ མ་ གས་པ ་ ང་ག ་བ ན་ ། ་ལ་འ ་ ད་བདག་ ས་ ས་པ་ ས་ག ག་ན་ ས་ ་བ་ ། ད་ པ་ ་ ས་པ་ ་བ་ ད་ ་བ ན་ ། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ག་ ན་ ་ ལ་ ་ཁང་བཟངས་ན་བ གས་ ་ ས་པ་ ། ན་པ་ ན་ མ་ གས་པ་དང་། གནས་ ་ཡན་ལག་བ ན་ ། ་ཡང་ ན་པ་ ་ ངས་ ད་ གས་པ ་ ར་ ས་པར་ ། ། ་ཡང་ལང་ཀར་ག གས་པ ་ མ ་ལས། ་ ་ ་ ང་ ག་ ན་ ། ། ག་པ་ཐམས་ཅད་ མ་ ངས་ པ། ། ག་ ་ མ་པར་ ་ ག་ ན། ། མས་དང་ མས་ལས་ ང་བ་ ངས། ། བས་དང་མ ན་ ས་གང་ བ་པ། ། ་དག་ ང་འ ན་དབང་ བ ས་ནས། ། གས་པ ་སངས་ ས་ ར་འཚང་ ། ། ལ་པ་ མས་ ་འ ར་འཚང་ ། ། ས་ག ངས་པ ་ ར་ ། །

12

wisdom mind of the tathāgatas, is the subject matter. The collection of words that explains the subject matter is the means of expression. Understanding the subject matter by way of this means of expression

is the purpose of the text. The attainment of enlightenment—the wisdom that realizes mind—which comes about through understanding the subject matter, is the ultimate purpose. As for the connection, it will not be stated here; it should be known by implication.

The opening lines, “Thus I once heard. The Bhagavān was present in the palace of the king of the gods of Akaniṣṭa, teaching the dharma to his retinue”, indicate the perfect setting. The statement, “Thus I once heard” demonstrates the great learnedness of the person reciting the sūtra.2 The phrase, “The Bhagavān was present in the palace of the king of the gods of Akaniṣṭa” indicates both the perfect teacher and the location. It should be understood, furthermore, that the teacher is the Buddha in a sambhogakāya form.

It is said in the Laṅkāvatārasūtra:

In the divine palace of Akaniṣṭa,
Free of all misdeeds,
Perpetually non-conceptual,
Free of dualistic mind and its patterns, Possessing the powers and clairvoyances, Masters of samādhi,

13

འ ར་ཐམས་ཅད་ལ་ ས་ ན་པ ་ བས་འ ར་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ འབའ་ ག་ལ་ ན་ག ། ཉན་ ས་ ་འ ར་ལ་ ་མ་ ན་ ། ། ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ས་བ མ་ ན་འདས་ལ་ ག་བཙལ་ ནས་འ ་ ད་ ས་ག ལ་ ། །བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ང་ བ་ མས་ དཔའ་ནམ་འ ་ཀ་མ ་ ་ མས་ ་ ར་བ ་བར་བག ་ ས་ ་བ་ ་ ང་བ ང་བ་བ ན་ ། ་ཡང་འ ར་འ ར་ག ས་ ང་བ ང་བ ། ། ་ ཡན་ལག་ ་ ན་ ་ལས་དང་ ན་ ངས་པ་དང་། ས་ ་ བ་པ་ ང་ ང་ གས་ ན་ ་ག ས་ གས་པས་ བ་པ་དང་ མས་ཅན་ ་ ་ ན་ ་བ ལ་བ་དཔག་ ་ ད་པར་ད ལ་བ་ལ་ གས་པར་འ ག་པ ་ ད་པའམ། ས་ཟབ་ ་ལ་བ ད་པས་ ་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔ ། ། ནམ་མཁའ་ ་ ་ ས་ ད་ གས་ ་ ད་པ ་ ་ ས་མངའ་བས་ ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ་ ་ ་བ་ ་ ང་ ་། །

14

The perfect buddhas attain enlightenment there. The emanations, however, attain enlightenment

here.3

In this particular instance of “teaching to the entire retinue,” the Buddha is teaching exclusively to bodhisattvas, not to a retinue of śrāvakas. The prelude of the sūtra is stated with the words: “The bodhisattva mahāsattva Ākāśagarbha prostrated to the Bhagavān and asked the following question: ‘Bhagavān, how should a bodhisattva regard the mind at the time of death?’” Thus, in this sūtra the prelude is provided by the retinue.

To explain the individual aspects of this passage, the word “bodhisattva” (Tib. byang chub sems dpa’) indicates one who has purified (byang) karma, the afflictions, and the cognitive obscurations and who
is perfected (
chub) in that he has completed the two great accumulations. The word “sattva” (Tib. sems dpa’, meaning “hero or warrior”) here refers to the
fact that they would willingly go to hell and other such places for countless eons for the sake of each and every sentient being. Alternatively, this word can refer to their great forbearance with regard to the profound dharma.
4

The name of the questioner is “Ākāśagarbha” (Tib. nam mkha’i snying po); he is so-called because he possesses the wisdom that realizes the sky-like

15

ག་པ ་མཚན་མ་ཐམས་ཅད་བ མ་ ང་ཡང་དག་པ ་ ་ ས་དང་ ན་ལ། ག་ཆད་ལ་ གས་པ ་མཐའ་ཐམས་ཅད་ལས་འདས་པ ་ བ མ་ ན་འདས་ལ་ ས་ངག་ ད་ ས་ ག་བཙལ་ ་ ག་ནས་ ས་ པ་འ ་ ད་ ས་ ས་ ། །བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ་ ་མ་བ ན་ ། ། ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ ་ག ་ མ་པ ་ ལ་ མས་དང་། ད ་བ་ ས་ ད་པ ་ ལ་ མས་དང་། མས་ཅན་ག ་ ན་ ད་པ ་ ལ་ མས་ དང་ ན་པ ། །ནམ་འ ་ཀ་མ ་ མས་ ། ག་ ་ ང་ ར་འ ང་ པ ་ ས་ ་ ་ ས་ག ་ ར་ ས་ ང་ ག་ ་བསམ་པར་ ། ། ་ ར་བ ་བར་བག ་ ས་ ་བ་ ་ མས་འ ས་ ན་དམ་པ ་ ས་ མས་ ་ ་ ར་ ས་པར་ ། མས་ ་ ་ ་ ་གང་། མས་ ་ རང་བ ན་ ་ ་ ་ ། ་ནས་ ན་ བ་ ་ ་ ར་བ ན། མས་ ་ རང་བ ན་ གས་ནས་ ་ ར་འ ར་ མ་པ ། །བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་བཀའ་ ལ་པ། ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ་ ང་ བ་ ང་ མས་དཔའ་ ནམ་འ ་ཀ་མ ་ ། འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ག ངས་ པ་ ་ ་བ ་ལན་ ་ ་ ་བས་མ་བཤད་ ། །

16

(nam mkha’) nature of reality. The “Bhagavān” (Tib. bcom ldan ‘das) is one who has destroyed (bcom) all conceptual characteristics, who possesses (ldan) genuine wisdom, and has transcended (‘das) all extremes of eternalism, nihilism, and so on. Ākāśagarbha pays homage to the Bhagavān with his body, speech, and mind, and makes his request as found in the lines of the text that follow.

The word “Bhagavān” in the next sentence can
be explained as above. The meaning of the word “bodhisattva,” however, can here be further explained as referring to one who has the basic discipline of binding negative actions, the discipline of amassing virtue, and the discipline of benefiting sentient beings. “The mind at the time of death” refers principally to the moment that the life-force wind (Skt.
prāṇavāyu, Tib. srog rlung) exits the body, but in fact this teaching should be kept in mind at all times.

The question, “How should a bodhisattva regard the mind?” means “How should one understand the ultimate? What is the essence of the mind? What is the nature of the mind like? How are things explained on the relative level? What happens when one realizes the nature of the mind?”

The sūtra then continues with the words, “The Bhagavān said, “Ākāśagarbha, at the moment of death, the bodhisattva should train in the wisdom

17

་ལ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ་ ས་ཐམས་ཅད་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ མ་པར་ དག་པས་ན་ད ས་ ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ ་བ་ལ་ གས་པས་ ་ག ང་ ་ ན་ ས་པར་བཀའ་ ལ་ ། མས་འ ས་ ན་དམ་པ ་ ས་ ་ ར་ ས་པར་ ་ མ་པ་ལ། ་ལ་ ས་ཐམས་ ཅད་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ མ་པར་དག་པས་ན་ད ས་ ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་ བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ག ངས་ ། ་ལ་ ས་པ་ ་ད གས་ ས་བ ང་ བ ། །འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ་ ་ ་བ ན་ག གས་པ་ མས་ ས་ ན་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔ ་ ད་པ་ ད་པ་ ་ ག་ནས་འ ང་བ་ ་ ར་ ས་པ ་ ་ ས་ ་ལ་ ་ ད་ ས་ ། ། ན་དམ་པ་ ང་ ་ཁམས་ ལ་ གས་པས་བ ས་པ ་ ས་ཐམས་ཅད་ག ད་མ་ནས་མ་ ས་པ ་ ར་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ མ་པར་དག་པ་ ། ས་ན་ ན་ག ་ ་བ་ ད་ ས་ པ ་ད ས་ ་ མས་རང་བ ན་ག ས་མ་ བ་ ང་ ་ ་ ད་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ་པར་ ། ། ་ཡང་ལང་ཀར་ག གས་པ་ལས།

18

of the time of death.’” This is the response to the question, and, since it is easy to understand, I will not comment on it here.

The Buddha continues by saying: “The wisdom of the time of death consists of the following: Since all phenomena are naturally pure, cultivate well the notion of lack of existence.” With these words, the Buddha begins to give a detailed explanation of the subject matter of the text.

To answer the question, “How should one understand the ultimate?” the Bhagavān says the following: “Since all phenomena are naturally pure, cultivate well the notion of lack of existence.” The phrase, “regarding this” serves to specify the topic under discussion.5 “The wisdom of the time of death” refers to the wisdom of the tathāgatas, as recognized by them when engaging in their bodhisattva conduct
in the past. This is explained in further detail below. Ultimately, because all phenomena consisting of the aggregates, elements and so forth are primordially unborn, they are naturally pure. This being so, one should train in understanding the notion that all entities capable of performing a function are by their very nature unestablished and essenceless.

It is said in the Laṅkāvatārasūtra: 19

གང་ ར་ ་ ས་རབ་ག གས་ན། །རང་བ ན་དག་ ་ ་ད གས་
། ། ་ ར་ ་དག་བ ད་ ་ ད། ། ་ ་ ད་ ང་ ད་པར་བཤད། ། ས་ ག ངས་པ་དང་། གཞན་ཡང་ ་ ད་ལས། ད་དང་ ད་པ ་ གས་ ལ་ ང་། ། ་དང་ ན་ ས་ ངས་པ་ ། ། ད་པ་ ་ ད་རང་མ ང་ ནས། ། མས་ ་ ད་ ་ མ་པར་དག ། ས་ག ངས་ ། ། ་ ར་ རང་བ ན་ག ས་ མ་པར་དག་པས་ ་ཡང་ ད་ན་ ་ གས་ ་ ང་བ་ གང་ ན་ མ་པ་ལ། ཐམས་ཅད་ ང་ བ་ ་ མས་ ་འ ས་པས་ན་ ང་ ་ ན་ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ག ངས་ ། འ ར་བ་ དང་ ་ངན་ལས་འདས་པ ་ ས་ཐམས་ཅད་རང་ ་ ང་ བ་ ་ མས་ ད་ ན་ག ། ་ ལ་ ན་ ་ ་བ་ མས་འ ད་པ་ ར་ ད་པ་མ་ ན་ ། ། ་ ར་ཡང་ལང་ཀར་ག གས་པ་ལས། ་ ར་ ས་པས་བ གས་ པ་ ། ། ་ ལ་ག ་ ་ ང་བ་ ད། ། མས་ ་ག གས་བ ན་བ ན་ ་ ང་། །བག་ཆགས་ ས་ ང་མ ་ག ང་བ ང་། ། ས་ག ངས་ ། ་ ར་མ་ གས་པ་ མས་ལ་ མས་ཅན་ལ་ད གས་པ ་ ང་ ས་ ་དག་ ་ ག་བ ལ་བ་དང་།

20

Upon thorough examination,
No nature can be seen.
Therefore, phenomena are said to be Inexpressible and essenceless.

And in the same text:

Seeing the world to be
Devoid of existence and nonexistence, Removed from both cause and condition, And in itself causeless, the mind is purified.

One may wonder, “If it is the case that things are naturally pure and that therefore nothing exists, what are all these various appearances?” In response to this, the Bhagavān says: “Since all dharmas are contained within bodhicitta, cultivate well a mind of great compassion.” All phenomena of saṃsāra and nirvāṇa are the nature of one’s enlightened mind, one’s own bodhicitta; they do not exist in themselves, as posited by materialists.6

Moreover, it is said in the Laṅkāvatārasūtra:

There are no external appearances
As imagined by the childish.
Mind appears in the same way as a reflection, And is deluded by habitual impressions.

Thus, one meditates on the suffering of those who 21

ས་ལ་ད གས་པ ་ ང་ ས་ ས་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ ག་པ་དང་ ག་ བ ལ་བ་དང་། ང་པ་དང་། བདག་ ད་པར་བ མ་པ་དང་། ད གས་ པ་ ད་པ ་ ང་ ་དང་ ང་པ་ ད་བ མ་ ། ་ ར་ ང་ ་ ན་ ས་ བ མས་ན། ར་སངས་ ས་ ་ ས་ཐམས་ཅད་འ ས་ ། ར་ཡང་ ས་ཡང་དག་པར་ ད་པ ་མ ་ལས། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ད ར་བག ་ ན་འ ར་ ས་ ར་བ ་འ ར་ ་ ན་ ་ ་གང་མ ས་པ་ ར་ད ང་ ་ གས་ཐམས་ཅད་མ ། །བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ་བ ན་ ་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔ ་ ང་ ་ ན་ ་གང་ ་མ ས་པ་ ར་སངས་ ས་ ་ ས་ ཐམས་ཅད་འ ས་ ས་ག ངས་ ། ། ་ན་ མས་ ་རང་བ ན་ ་ ་ ་ མ་པ་ལ། རང་བ ན་ག ས་ ད་གསལ་བས་ན་ ་ད གས་ པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ག ངས་ ། རང་བ ན་ག ས་ ད་ གསལ་བ ་ ར་ནམ་མཁའ་ ར་ ་ལ་ཡང་ ་ད གས་པ ་འ ་ ས་ བ མ་པར་ ་ །

22

do not yet realize this truth with the compassion
that has sentient beings as its reference point. One meditates on impermanence, suffering, emptiness, and the selflessness of all phenomena with the compassion that has dharmas as its reference point. Finally, one cultivates compassion without reference point by meditating on emptiness. If you can cultivate great compassion in this way, all of the buddhadharma is contained therein.

It is said in the Dharmasaṅgītisūtra:

For example, Bhagavān, wherever the precious wheel of the universal emperor is, there too his entire army will be gathered. In the same way, Bhagavān, wherever the great compassion of

the bodhisattvas is, there too all the buddhadharma will be gathered.

To the question, “What is the nature of the mind like?” the Buddha replies: “Since all phenomena are naturally luminous, cultivate well a mind free of reference point.” Since the nature of phenomena is naturally luminous, one should cultivate a state of mind free of any reference point whatsoever, like space.

23

་ ར་ཡང་ ་ ས་ ང་བ ་ ན་ལས། མས་ ་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ ད་ གསལ་བ་ ། ་ ར་ག ་ ་བ ་ ན་ ངས་པས་ ན་ ངས་ ང་རང་ བ ན་ ་ ན་ནས་ ན་ ངས་པར་ ་འ ར་ ས་ག ངས་པ་དང་། ཡང་ ་ ད་ལས། འཇམ་དཔལ་ ང་ བ་ ་ མས་ ་རང་བ ན་ ད་གསལ་ བ ་ ར་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ ད་གསལ་བ ། ། ་ ར་ ་ན། རང་བ ན་ ག ས་ ད་གསལ་བ་ ས་ ་ ། གང་རང་བ ན་ ་ ་ ན་ནས་ ན་ ངས་པ་ ད་པས་ནམ་མཁའ་དང་མ ངས་ ། ནམ་མཁ ་རང་བ ན་ ཅན་ནམ་མཁའ་ ན་འག ་བ་ནམ་མཁའ་ ་ ་ ། རབ་ ་ ད་གསལ་ བ ་ ར་ ་ ས་ག ངས་ ། ། ན་དམ་པ་ ་ ར་ ན་ན་ ན་ བ་ཙམ་ ་ ་ ར་བ ་ མ་པ་ལ། ད ས་ ་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ ག་པས་ན་ ་ལ་ ཡང་ ་ཆགས་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ག ངས་ ། ་དང་ ན་ག ས་བ ད་པ ་ད ས་ ་ཐམས་ཅད་ ད་ ག་མ་ ། མས་ཅན་ ་གནས་པར་འ ར་ ང་འ ་བས་ན་ ་ ག་པ ། ། ་ ར་འ ད་ པ ་ ན་ཏན་གང་ ་ཡང་ ང་བ་ལ་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔ ་ མས་ ་ ཆགས་པར་ ་རང་བ ན་ ང་པ་ ་བ ་བདག་ ད་ཅན་ ་བ མ་པར་ ་ །

24

Moreover, it is said in the Jñānālokālaṅkārasūtra:

The mind is naturally luminous; even though it may be afflicted by adventitious subsidiary afflictions, its nature is never afflicted.

It also says there:

Enlightenment, Mañjuśrī, is naturally luminous, since the nature of mind is luminous.

Why is it said to be “naturally luminous”?

It is described as “naturally luminous” because it has the nature of space, is completely unafflicted like space, is all-encompassing like space, and is comparable to space. It is thus said to be utterly luminous.

One may then wonder: “If it is this way on the ultimate level, how should one regard things on the merely relative level?”

In answer to this, the Bhagavān says: “Since all entities are impermanent, cultivate well a state of mind that is free of attachment to anything at all.” All entities that are produced by causes and conditions are momentary. Beings will not remain; they will change and move on to their next life; thus they are impermanent. Therefore, with their minds unattached

25

་ཡང་ ་ངན་ལས་འདས་པ་ལས། ་མ་འ ས་ ས་ མས་ ་ ག ། ་ ང་འ ག་པ ་ ས་ཅན་ ན། ། ས་ནས་འ ག་པར་འ ར་བས་ ན། ། ་བས་ ར་ ་ ་བ་བ ། ། ས་ག ངས་ ། ། མས་ ་རང་ བ ན་ ་ ་བ་བ ན་ ་ གས་ན་ ར་འ ར་ མ་པ་ལ། མས་ གས་ ན་ ་ ས་ ན་པས་སངས་ ས་གཞན་ ་ ་བཙལ་བ ་འ ་ ས་ རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ག ངས་ ། ང་ ་ག ངས་པ་ ་ ་ མས་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ ད་གསལ་བ ་བདག་ ད་ ་ ་བ་བ ན་ ་ ས་པ ་ ་ ས་ ་ ད་ལས་སངས་ ས་ ས་ཐ་ ད་ ་བར་བཏགས་ ། ་ལས་གཞན་ ་སངས་ ས་ ད་པར་ ་འ ར་ ། ་ ར་ཡང་ ་ ་ག ད་པ་ལས། གང་ ས་ང་ལ་ག གས་ ་མ ང་། །གང་ ས་ང་ ལ་ ར་ ས་པ། ། ག་པར་ ང་བར་ ས་པ་ ། ། ་ ་ ་ ས་ང་ ་ མ ང་། །སངས་ ས་ མས་ ་ ས་ ད་ ། །འ ན་པ་ མས་ ་ ས་ ་ ། ། ས་ ད་ ས་པར་ ་ ན་པས། ། ་དག་ མ་པར་ ས་ ་ ས། ། ས་ག ངས་པ་དང་།

26

to any sense objects at all, bodhisattvas should meditate on the empty and pacified nature of all phenomena.

It is said in the Mahāparinirvāṇasūtra:

Alas! Conditioned things are impermanent.
Their nature is such that they come about and then

disintegrate.
Since they come about and then disintegrate, Swiftly attain the blissful state of peace!

If one realizes the nature of mind as it is, what will happen? In answer to this, the Bhagavān says: “When the mind is realized, that itself is wisdom. Therefore, cultivate well the notion that buddha is not to be searched for elsewhere.” Here, the word “buddha” applies to the wisdom that unmistakenly knows the naturally luminous nature of mind, as was discussed above. You will not find any “buddha” apart from this. As it says in the Vajracchedikasūtra:

Those who see me as form
And those who follow me as the sound of my voice, They engage in mistaken practice;
They do not see me.

The Buddha should be seen as dharmatā. The guides are the dharmakāya. Dharmatā is not a conventional knowable; It cannot be known conventionally.

27

ལང་ཀར་ག གས་པ་ལས། ག་པ་ ངས་པ ་ མས་ ད་ ། ། ད་ ་ མ་ ས་བཟ ག་པ་ ། ། ས་ མས་ཐམས་ཅད་ ས་པ ་ ར། ། མས་ ་སངས་ ས་ ས་ངས་འཆད། ། ས་ག ངས་ ། ། ན་ བ ས་པ་ལ་དགའ་བ་ མས་ ་ ར། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ གས་ ་བཅད་པ་ ་བཀའ་ ལ་པ། ས་ མས་རང་བ ན་ མ་དག་པས། ། ད ས་ ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། ། ང་ བ་ མས་དང་རབ་ ན་ པས། ། ང་ ་ ན་ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། །རང་བ ན་ ་ད གས་ ད་ གསལ་བས། ། ་ད གས་པ་ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། །ད ས་ ་ཐམས་ ཅད་ ་ ག་པས། །ད ས་ ་ ་ལའང་ ་ཆགས་བ མ། ། མས་ ་ ་ ས་འ ང་བ ་ ། །སངས་ ས་གཞན་ ་མ་འ ལ་ ག ། ས་ ག ངས་ ། ས་ཐམས་ཅད་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ མ་པར་དག་པ ་ ར། ད ས་ ་མཚན་ ད་ ་ ད་ ། མ་ ང་བ་ད ས་ ར་འ ་ ས་བ ད་ པ་ ་ ས་ ་ ན་པ་གང་ ག་ ག་ ་ ་ལ་ ས་ ་བ་དང་། བ ང་ བར་འ ད་པ་བ ན་ ། ང་ བ་ མས་དཔས་ ་ ར་ ་བ ། ། ་ ར་ཡང་ལང་ཀར་ག གས་པ་ལས།

28

And in the Laṅkāvatārasūtra it is taught:

The nature of mind free from thoughts,
In which mental consciousness has subsided, Knows all things;
Therefore, I teach that this mind is buddha.

For those with an inclination for summaries, the Bhagavān then spoke the following in verse:

Since phenomena are by nature pure,
Cultivate the notion of lack of existence.
Since they are infused with bodhicitta, Cultivate a mind of great compassion.
Since everything is naturally luminous, Cultivate a mind free of reference point.
Since all entities are impermanent,
Cultivate a state of mind free from attachment. Mind is the cause for the arising of wisdom; Don’t search for buddha elsewhere!

Since all phenomena are naturally pure, they
can [and do] appear as entities. Those who do not understand this and thus conceptualize phenomena as existent are like a dimwit who wants to bathe in and drink the water of a mirage. Bodhisattvas, however, do not view things in this way. As it is said in the
Laṅkāvatārasūtra:

29

མས་ ་བ་ ་ ག་ ་ལ། ། ་ ར་ད ད་ཀ་ག ་བ་ ། ། ་ གས་ མས་ ་ ་འ ན་ ། ། ་ལ་ད ས་ ་ ད་པ་ ན། ། ས་ག ངས་པ་ ་ ། ། ན་དམ་པར་ན་ ང་ བ་ ་ མས་ག ད་མ་ནས་མ་ ས་ པ ་ ར་ ་ ར་མ་ གས་པ ་འག ་བ་ མས་ལ་ ་མ ་ ས་ ་ལ་ ་མ ་ ས་ ་གཞན་ག ས་པས་ ང་ ་བ ད་པ་ ར་ ང་ ་ ན་ ་བ མ་པར་ ་ ། ་ ར་ཡང་ལང་ཀར་ག གས་པ་ལས། ་དང་ ང་དང་ ་ ་ལས། ། ་མ་ མ་པར་མ ས་ ར་ ང་། ། ་མ་ ་ ་ ད་པ་ ། ། ས་ ་རང་བ ན་ ་བ ན་ ། ། ས་ག ངས་ ། ་ ར་ བ མས་ན་ད གས་པ་ ད་པ ་ ང་ ་ ་ ། ང་ ་མ ག་ ན་ ། ། ་ ་རང་བ ན་ག ས་གསལ་བས་ནམ་མཁའ་ ར་ད གས་ ་ ད་པ ་ ར་རང་ ་ མ་པར་ ག་པ་ཙམ་ལས་ གས་ན་ བ་པ ་ ད ས་ ་ ད་པ་བ ན་ ་ ས་པ་ ངས་པ་ མས་ ་གཤམ་ག ་ ་དང་། ་ལམ་ ་ ་ལ་འ ད་ཆགས་པ་ ར་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔས་ ན་པ ་ ཆགས་པ་ ་ ད་ ། །

30

Just as a deceptive mirage
That shimmers in the spring time
Is taken by deer to be water,
When in fact there is nothing there. . .

Thus, bodhicitta being primordially unborn on the ultimate level, one should train in great compassion towards those who do not realize this in the manner of one illusory person having compassion for another illusory person.

And as it is said in the same sūtra:

Just as a captivating illusion appears From grass, wood, and gravel,
Yet is not really there—
Such is the nature of phenomena.

If one trains in this way, compassion without reference point will arise. This is the supreme compassion. Since all of this, being naturally luminous, is free from reference point like space, there is nothing that exists separate from one’s own conceptions. Nevertheless, the foolish and confused become attached to these appearances like someone becoming attached to the appearances of a dream, or to the child of a barren woman. Bodhisattvas, however, do not give rise to such attachment.

31

་ཡང་ལང་ཀར་ག གས་པ་ལས། མ་པར་ ག་ལས་ ད་ན་ ། ། འ ས་ ས་འ ས་མ་ ས་ ད་ན། ། ་ལམ་ ་གཤམ་ ་བ ན་ ། ། ས་པ་ གས་བ ད་འ ན་པར་ ད། ། ས་ག ངས་ ། ། མས་ མ་པར་ གས་པ ་ ་མ་དག་པ་ ད་ཡང་དག་པ ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་ ། ་ ད་སངས་ ས་ ས་ ་ ། །མཚན་དང་ད ་ ད་ ས་བ ན་པ ། ། ག གས་ ་ ་ ་ ་ ་ ན། ། ་ ར་ལང་ཀར་ག གས་པ་ལས། མ ན་པར་འ ་ ད་མཚན་ མས་ ས། །སངས་ ས་མཚན་ ན་མ་ ན་ ། ། ་དག་འ ར་ ས་ ར་ ན་བ ན། ། ས་ ་སངས་ ས་ ་བ ད་ ། །སངས་ ས་མཚན་ ་ ་ ས་ ། ། ་བ ་ ས་པ་ མ་ ངས་པ། ། ་ ་རང་ ག་ ་བ་ གས། ། ས་པ་ ་ ར་ མ་ འ མས་པ ། ། ས་ག ངས་ ། ། ་ན་སངས་ ས་ ས་འག ་བ ་ ན་ ་ ར་མཛད་ མ་པ་ལ། ་ཡང་ལང་ཀར་ག གས་པ་ལས། ་མ་ ཟ་བ་ ་ ་ ད། ། ་བ ན་འ ང་བ་ ར་ ་ མས། །

32

As it is said in the Laṅkāvatārasūtra:

Apart from fabricated concepts,
There are no conditioned or unconditioned

phenomena.
Yet, like barren women dreaming of sons, Bewildered foolish people grasp at phenomena.

The mind purified of the stain of concepts is what is called “genuine wisdom.” This is what we call “buddha.” It is not the rūpakāya adorned with the major and minor marks. As it is said in the Laṅkāvatārasūtra:

The buddhas are not authentic Because of conditioned marks.
Those are the marks of a Cakravartin; They are not the marks of the buddhas.

The mark of a buddha is wisdom, Free from all errors of the view, Realized through self-awareness, The destroyer of all faults.

One may wonder, “Then how does a buddha carry out the benefit of beings?” Regarding this, the Laṅkāvatārasūtra says:

Just as the sun, the moon, the glow of fire,
And likewise the elements and a wish-fulfilling

jewel

33

མ་པར་ ་ ག་ ན་ ་འ ང་། ། ་བ ན་སངས་ ས་སངས་ ས་ ད། ། ས་ག ངས་པ་ ་ ། །མ ག་བ ་བ ་ ར། བ མ་ ན་ འདས་ ས་ ་ ད་ ས་བཀའ་ ལ་པ་དང་། ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ་ལ་ གས་པ་འ ར་ཐམས་ཅད་རབ་ ་དགའ་ནས་ བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ག ངས་པ་ལ་མ ན་པར་བ ད་ ་ ས་པ་ ་ ་བས་མ་བཤད་ ། ། ས་རབ་དང་ ན་གང་དག་ ག །འ ར་ག ་ ་ མ ་ ད་ ག་ ས། ། ལ་ ད་མ ་ ་འ ་བཤད་པས། །འག ་ ན་རང་ མས་ གས་པར་ ག །འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ་མ ་ མ་ པར་བཤད་པ། བ་ད ན་ ་ས་ ་ ས་མཛད་པ་ གས་ །། །།

34

Are non-conceptual and yet they function, So too is the buddhahood of the Buddha.

The sūtra concludes with the following words: “The Bhagavān having said this, the bodhisattva Ākāśagarbha and everyone else gathered in the retinue rejoiced with delight and praised the Bhagavān’s teaching.” This is easy to understand, so I will not comment on it here.

By my explanation of this sūtra,
Which instantly liberates the intelligent From the ocean of saṃsāra,
May all beings realize their own minds!

This concludes the commentary on The Noble Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra composed by Ācārya Prajñāsamudra.

35

༄༅། །འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ་ ག་པ་ ན་ ་མ ་འ ལ་པ།

་གར་ ད་ ། ་ས་ ་ ་ན་མ་ ་ ་ན་ ་ ། ད་ ད་ ། འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ་ ག་པ་ ན་ ་མ ་འ ལ་ པ། སངས་ ས་དང་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ཐམས་ཅད་ལ་ ག་འཚལ་ ། །རང་གཞན་ ན་ བ་ ་ ད་ ་ ན་པ། ། ་ག ས་ ན་པ ་ འ ན་པ་ ་ལ་ ག་འཚལ་ནས། ། ས་ ད་ ན་གསལ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ། ། ན་གསལ་ ར་ ་འབད་པ་ ན་ ་ ། །འ ་ ད་བདག་ ས་ ས་པ ་ ས་ག ག་ན་ ས་ ་བ་ལ་ གས་པ་ག ངས་ ། ་ ལ་ཉན་ ས་པ་ཁ་ ག་ ས་ ག་པར་ ག་པ་བསལ་པ ་ ད་ ་ ག་ ་ཆ་ མ་པ་བ ་དང་ ན་པར་བཤད་པ ། །བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ག་ ན་ ་ ལ་ ་ཁང་བཟངས་ན་བ གས་ ་ ས་ ་བ་ལ་ གས་པ་ ག ངས་ །

36

A Commentary on the Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra

By Śāntideva

In the Indian language: Āryātyayajñānamahāyānasūtravṛtti. In the Tibetan language: pakpa daka yeshe shyé jawa tekpa chenpö do’i drelpa.
In the English language:
A Commentary on the Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra.

Homage to all buddhas and bodhisattvas!

Having bowed in homage to the guide who possesses the two kāyas

And the stainless wisdom that accomplishes the benefit of self and others,

I will make great effort to clarify the meaning Of the wisdom of the time of death, luminous

dharmatā.

The opening section, “Thus I once heard...” is explained as having four parts for the purpose of removing the misunderstanding of certain śrāvakas.1 The sūtra then reads, “The Bhagavān was present in the palace of the king of the gods of Akaniṣṭa...” He is called “Bhagavān” (Tib. bcom ldan ‘das) since he

37

བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ་ ན་ ངས་པ་དང་ ་བ ་ ན་ ངས་པ་ཐམས་ཅད་ བ མ་པས་ ། ། ན་པ་ ་ ན་ཏན་ ག་དང་ ན་པས་ ། །འདས་ པ་ ་འ ར་བ་དང་ ་ངན་ལས་འདས་པ་ག ས་ཀ་ལ་ ་གནས་པ་ ། མ ན་པར་ གས་པ་ལས་ ང་། ་ ལ་ཕ་ ལ་མཐའ་ལ་ ན། ། ་དག་བར་ན་ ་གནས་ ང་། ། ས་ མས་མཉམ་པ་ ད་ ས་པས། ། ས་བཤད། ཡང་། འ ར་བ་དང་ ་ ་ངན་འདས། །འ ་ག ས་ ད་ པ་མ་ ན་ ། །འ ར་བ་ ངས་ ་ ས་པ་ལ། ། ་ངན་འདས་ ས་ བ ད་པ་ ན། ། ས་ག ངས་པས་ན་བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ། །ཁ་ ག་ ། མ་ ག་ག ད་ལས་སངས་ ར་དང་། ། ་ ས་ ར་ན་སངས་ ས་ ས་པ་དང་ཡང་མ ངས་ ། །ཡང་ན་བ མ་པ་ ་བ ད་ལ་ གས་པ་ བ ་བ མ་པའམ། ན་པ་ ན་ཏན་དང་ ན་པས་ ། ། ས་ ན་པ་ བཤད་ནས་གནས་ ་ ག་ ན་ ས་པས་ ། ག་ ན་ག ་གནས་ ག་ ་བ ད་པ ་ ང་ཁམས་ ་ལས་ ་ ལ་ ་ ག་པ་དང་ ལ་པ ་ ་ བ གས་པས་ན་ ་ཁང་བཟངས་ ། །

38

has destroyed (bcom) the afflictions and the subsidiary afflictions, possesses (ldan) the six qualities,2 and does not abide (‘das) in either saṃsāra or nirvāṇa.
As it is said in the
Abhisamayālaṅkāra:

Since it does not abide on this side,
That side, or in between,
And since it is the knowledge of the equality of

time... And:

Saṃsāra and nirvāṇa do not exist;
The knowledge of the nature of saṃsāra Is what is called “nirvāṇa.”

This explanation of the word “Bhagavān” is equivalent to that given by some who say that he is called “Buddha” (Tib. sangs rgyas) because he has awakened (sangs) from the sleep of ignorance and has expanded (rgyas) his wisdom. Alternatively, one may interpret the word “Bhagavān” as indicating that he has destroyed (bcom) the four māras and that he possesses (ldan) qualities.

Having identified the teacher with this word, the location is then indicated by the word, “Akaniṣṭa.” The non-conceptual king of the gods lives in the densely- arrayed pure realm of Akaniṣṭa; thus the text reads “the

39

བ གས་པ ་ ད་ལམ་ག ས་ ། །ཡང་ན་མཉམ་པར་བཞག་པས་ ས་ འཆད་ ། ། ས་ ན་པ་དང་ མ་པར་དཀར་པ ་ ས་གཞན་ ན་པ་ལ་ ་བ་ ་ ན་ག ་གང་ཟག་བ ན་པ ་ ར་ཡང་ ་ ་ ང་ བ་ མས་ དཔའ་ མས་དཔའ་ ན་ ་ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ས་ ། ། ་ལ་ ན་པ་ དག་པ་བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ངས་ ད་ གས་པ ་ ་དང་ ན་པས་ གནས་ ག་ ན་ ་ ་བ་ ་དག་པ་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔས་ ས་པས་ ་ ་ན་ ད་ ང་འ ག་ལ་ གས་པ་ གས་ ་ ན་ ་འ ལ་པ་ཡང་ ད་ ། ། ས་པ ་ ག་ ་བ ན་པ་བ མ་ ན་འདས་ལ་ ང་ བ་ མས་ དཔའ་ནམ་འ ་ཀ་མ ་ མས་ ་ ར་བ ་བར་བག ་ ས་ག ལ་པ་ དང་ ས་ ་བ་ ས་ ། ་ལ་བ ལ་ ན་འདས་ལ་ གས་པ་ཧ་ཅང་ ས་པས་ ག་ ། ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ ས་པ་ ། ང་ བ་ནམ་ མཁ ་མཚན་ ད་ ། ། ག་པ་ཐམས་ཅད་ ངས་ ར་ ། ། ས་བཤད་ པ་ནས། ག ང་པ་ ་དང་ ་ ་བ་དང་མ ་ ་དང་། །

40

palace of the king of the gods.” The Bhagavān was staying there, or alternatively it could be said that he was resting in equipoise there.

In order to indicate the one who is requesting a teaching on the dharma or other virtuous topics, the sūtra says: “when the bodhisattva mahāsattva Ākāśagarbha...”

Since the pure teacher, the Bhagavān, possesses the saṃbhogakāya, and since the pure supplicant, the bodhisattva, is requesting the teaching in Akaniṣṭa, the sūtra may also be explained from a tantric point of view, using ideas such as unified reality, etc.

With the question, “How should a bodhisattva regard the mind at the time of death?” the words of the query to the venerable Bhagavān are made. This much is sufficient to explain the meaning of the word “Bhagavān,” etc.

The word “bodhisattva” (Tib. byang chub sems dpa’) can be explained as follows:

Enlightenment (byang chub) has the characteristic of space,

Since it is free of all concepts....
They are known as “great heroes” (
sems dpa’) Because of their great generosity, wisdom, and

power,

41

ལ་པ་ མས་ ་ ག་ ན་མ ག་ལ་ གས་པ་དང་། ། ་ཆ་ ན་ ་བ ས་ ང་བ ད་ ་ ་འ ལ་བ། ། ་ ་ ར་ན་ མས་དཔའ་ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ ད། ། ས་ག ངས་པས་ ན་ ་ ན་ཡང་ ་ ན་ ། མས་ཅན་ག ་ ན་ལ་དཔའ་བས་ ་ ས་ ང་བཤད། འཕགས་པ་ ་ལས་དང་ ན་ ངས་པ་ལས་ ང་ ་ ར་པས་འཕགས་པ་ ། ན་ ང་འ ལ་བར་འ ང་པ ་ བས་བ མ་པས་ ། ། ས་ན་ཨ ཏ་ ་ ་ལས་བཤད་ ། ། ང་ ས་མ ན་ནས་ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ས་ ས་ གས་ ་ ག་ ་བ ་ ས་ ས་ བས་པ ་ མས་ཅན་ག ་ནམ་འ ་ བ་ ། ་ ག་པར་ ར་པས་ ན་ ང་འ ལ་བར་འ ང་པ་ཡན་ལག་བ ་ ག ས་ ་འ ར་བ ་ མས་ཅན་ ་ ་ ག་པ་ ། ག་འ མས་པ་ འ ་ཀ་མ་ ལ་ ་ལ་གདམས་པ ་མ ་ལ་ གས་པ་ལས་འ ང་བ ་ ས་ ་ མས་ ་ ར་བ ་བར་ ་ ས་ ས་པ་དང་།

42

Because they have entered the supreme vehicle of the victorious ones,

And because, donning their great armour, they tame the trickery of māra.

This also provides the explanation of the word “great” (chen po, from sems dpa’ chen po in the root text). It is further explained that they are heroic (sems dpa’) in their work for the benefit of beings.

The word “noble” (Skt. ārya, Tib. ‘phags pa) indicates that one has distanced oneself from
karma and the afflictions by destroying the links
of interdependent origination. This word may thus
be explained in the same manner as the term ‘foe- destroyer’ (Skt.
arhat, Tib. dgra bcom pa). Mentioning him by name, the sūtra relates how Ākāśagarbha poses the question: how should one should view the mind at the time of death?

Here, “the time of death” refers to the occasion
of the death of sentient beings, who are by nature impermanent and marked by the four seals of the dharma, revolving through the twelve links of interdependent origination. The moment of death is the dissolution and destruction of their life-force, as described in the
Rājādeśasūtra and other texts.

43

བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་བཀའ་ ལ་པ། ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ་ ད་ ས་ ང་ལ་ ས་པ་ ་ གས་ ་ ད་དང་བ ་ ་ནས་ ན་ ག ངས་ གས་ པར་བཤད་པར་ ་ ་ ས་བཀའ་ ལ་ ། ག་མ་ནས་རང་ ་ མས་ མ་ གས་པས་འ ར་བར་འ མ་པས་ན་ ་ལ་ ་ ་ན་འ ་ མས་དང་ ལ་བ་ ་ ད་ ། ། ན་ ང་འ ལ་བ ་ ས་ལས་མ་འདས་པ ་ ར་ ། ། ་ ར་ན་ ་ ་ན་འ ་དང་འ ལ་བར་འ ད་པས་འདའ་ཀ ་ ་ ས་ ན་ག ས་ བ་པ་ ས་པ་དང་ ལ་བ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ། ། ས་ ལས་མ ན་ནས་ནམ་འ ་ཀ་མ ་བ མ་པར་ ། ། ་ཡང་། ་བ་ བ་པར་ ད་པ་ལ། །བ ན་པས་འ བ་པས་ ས་ ་དང་། །མ ་ལ་ ་ ར་ ་བ ན་ ། ། ས་ག ངས་པས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ གང་བ མ་པ ་ད ས་ ་དང་བཅས་པས་བ ན་ནས། ་ ་ ་དག་ ་ ་ ་ ད་ ས་པ་དང་བཅས་པ་འཆད་པར་འ ད་ནས་ ་བས་འདའ་ཀ་མ ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ་ ་གང་ ་ན་ ས་ ས་པ་དང་། ་ལ་ ས་ ལ་ ་ ས་ ་ ་ ས་བ མ་པ་ ། །

44

The Bhagavān then replies: “Ākāśagarbha, the question you have asked me is excellent. Listen attentively; I will explain it well. From the beginning you have been wandering in saṃsāra due to not realizing the nature of your mind. It is not possible in this situation to break free of birth, old age, sickness, and death, as you have not transcended the process
of interdependent origination. Therefore, since you wish to be liberated from birth, old age, sickness, and death, you should meditate on the wisdom of the time of death, which is spontaneously present and free from constructs. You should meditate on this, considering the lack of time.”

As it is said:

When undertaking this work,
One should act with zeal,
Like one whose head has caught fire.

With these words, the Buddha explains the fact that one should meditate, and he also gives an indication of the object of meditation. Then, wishing to explain the nature of these subjects in more detail, he himself poses the question: what is meant by the “wisdom of the time of death?”

The phrase, “regarding this”3 indicates the topic, the meditation on wisdom. To answer the question,

45

་ ར་བ མ་ན། ས་ཐམས་ཅད་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ མ་པར་དག་པས་ ན་ད ས་ ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ ་བ་ ། ས་ཐམས་ཅད་ ས་པ་ ་གངས་དང་ད ས་ ་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་མ་ ས་ པ ། ། ས་ ་མཚན་ ད་འ ན་ ར་ ས་ ས་ ་ ས་ག ངས་པས་ བ་པར་ ་བ ་ བ་ ་ལ་མ་ བ་པ་ ད་པས་ན་ ས་ཐམས་ཅད་རང་ བ ན་ནམ་ ་ ་ ད་ ས་ མ་པར་དག་པ་ ། ད ན་བ གས་ལས། ས་ མས་ཐམས་ཅད་དག་པ་ ། ། ས་ ན་ལ་ གས་ད གས་ པ་ ད། ། ་བས་རང་བ ན་ ་ ་ལ། །ད ས་ གས་འ ན་པ་ག་ལ་ ད། ། ས་ག ངས་པས་ན་རང་དང་ ་ ས་ ་ཐམས་ཅད་ད ས་ ་ ད་པས་ ན་ ་ ་ ད་ ས་ ང་པ་བ ད་ ་ ད་པ ་གསལ་ ང་ ་ ་ ད་ལས་འདས་པར་བཤད་ ། ། ་ ར་ན། ནམ་མཁའ་མ ང་ ས་ མས་ཅན་ ག་ ་རབ་བ ད་པ། །ནམ་མཁའ་ ་ ར་མ ང་ ་ ན་ འ ་བ ག་པར་བག ། ་ ར་ ས་མ ང་བ་ཡང་ ་བ ན་ག གས་པས་ བ ན། །

46

“How should one meditate on it?” he says: “Since all phenomena are naturally pure, cultivate well the notion of lack of existence.” “All phenomena” refers to everything that can be named, all entities without exception. It is explained that “phenomena” are so- called because they bear their own characteristics. 4 Thus, since there is no phenomenon that does not bear this characteristic of purity, all phenomena are naturally, or by their essence, pure. It is said in the Ratnakūṭa:

All phenomena are pure;
Faults and blemishes are beyond reference point. Therefore, on the level of the essential nature How could there be perception of existence and

the like?

Thus, it is explained that since all particular and general phenomena lack true existence, they are empty by nature, inexpressibly luminous, and transcendent of any essence. That is why it is said:

Beings express in words: “I see space.”
Examine this—how is it that one sees space? This is the way the Tathāgata explains the seeing

of phenomena.

47

ས་ད ་ ན་ ར་བ་ཡང་ཡང་བཤད་ ། ། ས་ད ས་ ་ ན་དམ་ མཚན་ ད་ལ་གནས་པ་བཤད་ནས་གང་ཟག་ལ་ ས་པ་བ ན་པ ་ ར་ ན་ བ་ ་ཆད་ ད་པ་བ ན་པ ་ ར་ ན་ བ་ལ་ ་འ ས་ལ་ ག ད་པ་ ད་པ་ ང་པ ་ ར། ས་ཐམས་ཅད་ ང་ བ་ མས་ ་ འ ས་པས་ན་ ང་ ་ ན་ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ ་ བ་ག ངས་ ། གང་ཟག་ ས་རབ་ ང་བ་ ་ཐ་མ་ལ་བ བ་པ་ མས་ ལ་ ས་ནས་ ང་བ་འ ་ ད་པ་མ་ ན་ ། ས་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ ་བ་ གཞན་ལས་ ་ག ད་པས་ ད་པར་ ་ ་བར་ ག་པ་ མ་ག ས་ ང་ ཁས་ ན་པར་ ང་ན་ ་ལས་འ ་རབ་ ་ ་གནས་པ་ ན་གསལ་ ང་ པར་གནས་པས་ན། ང་པ་ ་ན་ཡང་ ན་ ། ། ང་ ད་ ང་ ་ ང་ ་ ཅན། ། ས་བཤད། ག་པ་ ང་མ་ མས་ ་ག ད་པ་ཙམ་ ད་པས་ ན་ ། ཕན་འ གས་དང་བཅས་པས་གནས་པས་ ག་པ་ ན་ ན་ གསལ་ལས་ ང་།

48

It is explained in this way repeatedly, combining meaning with example.

The Buddha thus explains the state of things on
the ultimate level. Then, in order to avoid the pitfall
of negligence of cause and effect, Buddha explains how, in accordance with individual experience, the relative level of reality is unconfined, saying: “
Since all dharmas are contained within bodhicitta, cultivate well a mind of great compassion.

From the perspective of those of lesser intelligence who are training in the lower levels of wisdom, all that appears does indeed exist, and both vehicles accept that the root of all dharma teachings is characterized by the precept of not harming others. Beyond this, however, there is the non-abiding, luminous empty nature, which is explained thus:

It is not merely empty; rather it is emptiness with a core of compassion.

Furthermore, in the higher vehicles, one does not merely refrain from harm but one also engages actively in benefiting others. As it is said in the Luminous Jewel of the Vehicles:

49

ང་ བ་ མས་ལ་རབ་གནས་པ། ། ང་ ད་ལ་ གས་ཐག་ ་ ང་། ། ཐབས་དང་ ས་རབ་ ང་འ ལ་ན། ། ད་ ལ་གང་ ར་གནས་ ང་ ། ། ་ན་ ད་ལ་འ ར་བ་ ད། ། ས་ག ངས་པ་དང་། ད ་མ་ ་ ་ ན་ ད་ལས། ང་ ་ ལ་ ་ མས་ཅན་ ། ། ་ ་ ང་ བ་ མས་ ལས་ ང་། ། ས་པས་ན་འགལ་བ་ ད་པ་དང་། །བ བ་བ ས་ལས་ ང་། ང་ བ་ ་ཡང་ ་བ ན་ ། ། ས་ག ངས་པས་ན་གང་མཐའ་ ག ས་ ་ ་ ང་བར་ ་བ ་ ད་ ་ག ངས་ ། ། ་ ར་ན་ ན་ག ་ བ་ད ན་ མས་ ང་མཐའ་ག ས་ལས་མ་ ལ་པས་འ ག་པར་ ་ ས་ག ངས་ ། ། ས་ན་ ག་ ན་ ་ གས་ ་བས་ཧ་ཅང་མ་ ས་ ། ། ས་ཆད་ ་ལ་ གས་པ་ མ་པར་བཀག་ནས། ད་ ་ད ས་ ་ ན་ ང་བ་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ གས་ ན་ལ་བ མ་པ་འཆད་པ་ ། ས་ ཐམས་ཅད་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ ད་གསལ་བས་ན་ ་ད གས་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་བ ན་པ་ །

50

The one who practices bodhicitta
Is not far from emptiness and the like. When method and wisdom are united,
No matter what one does,
There is no change in the nature of reality.

And, from the Mādhyamaka Treatise on the Essence of Reality:

The object of compassion is sentient beings And its cause is bodhicitta.

Thus, there is no contradiction. Also, in the Sikṣāsamuccaya, the following instruction is given so that one does not fall into either of the two extremes:

Make your mind stable in bodhicitta.

Thus, the masters of the past have advised us to practice without falling astray into either of the two extremes. Since the words and their meaning are easy to comprehend, I have not elaborated very much on this section.

Having in this way refuted the extreme view
of nihilism and so on, the Buddha now explains the meditation on the main point, the reality of all appearances, by saying:
“Since all phenomena are naturally luminous, cultivate well a mind free of reference point.”

51

་ཡང་རང་ལ་ ང་པ ་ ས་འ ་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ ་ ད་ལ་ ག་པ་དང་ ལ་བས་ བ་ ད་ ད་ ། ད ར་ན་ནམ་མཁའ་རང་བ ན་ག ས་དག་ པ་བ ན་ ། ། ་བས་ན་ སཐམས་ཅད་ ད་གསལ་བ་ ། ད ར་ན་ ་ མ ་ ད་ ར་བ ན་ ། ། ་ལ་ཁ་ ག་ན་ ། ད་ ་ད ་ལ་ག ད་པ་ ད་ ། ནམ་མཁའ་དག་པ་ལ་ ་མ་ ང་བ་ལ་ ད་ ར་གསལ་ ང་ ན་ལ་ གས་པས་ བ་ག གས་ ད་ན་ ་གསལ་བ་བ ན་ད ་མ་ བ་ ། ག ད་ ་ ་ན། ས་ ་ག ད་ ། ་མ ་ ད་ ར་ལ་ ་ནམ་ ཡང་ བ་ག གས་ ད་པས་ ་གསལ་བ་དང་ ད་པས་གསལ་བ་ལ་ གས་པ་དང་ ་ ་ མས་ཅན་ག ་ ང་པ་ལ་ ང་པ ་ ར་ ། ། ས་ ན་ ས་ མས་ ་རང་བ ན་ལ་ ད་གསལ་བ་ བ་པ་ ད་པ་དང་། ་ གསལ་བ་ བ་བཅས་ ད་པས་ན་ མས་ཅན་ག ་ ང་བ་ལ་ ན་ ། ན་ ངས་པ ་ བ་པ་ལ་ གས་པ་གསལ་བས་ ང་ ས་ ་ ་ ་ ད་ ལ་གསལ་བ་ ད་ལ། བ་པས་ ་གསལ་བ་ ད་པར། ཡང་ད ་མ་ གས་པ་བ ག་པ་ལས།

52

All phenomena that appear are essentially free
of concepts, and thus without obscuration, like the naturally pure sky. Therefore, all phenomena are naturally luminous, like the rays of the sun. Some may argue that this analogy is invalid, saying that even though the rays of the sun may be luminous in the clear sky, if there is obscuration due to clouds or anything else, they will not be luminous. They will claim that for this reason the analogy is not established and is invalid.

However, the analogy is not invalid. The fact that the sun’s rays are not luminous when obscured by clouds but are luminous when not obscured by them is only how things appear in the general experience of beings. It is not that the nature of phenomena itself is luminous when unobscured and non-luminous when obscured; this is simply how it occurs within the experience of sentient beings.

Thus, clearing away the afflictive and other types of obscurations will not actually make the nature of phenomena luminous, and, in the same way, while this nature remains obscured, this will not make it non- luminous.

As it is said in the Mādhyamaka Treatise on the Analysis of Reasonings:

53

ས་ ་ད ས་ ་གནས་པ་ལ། ། ས་དང་ ་ ང་གསལ་ ་གསལ།། འ ད་པར་ ར་པ ་གང་ཟག་ ། །ང་ ་འ ར་ ་ ་ ་ གས། ། ་ བས་ ད་གསལ་ ང་པ་ ན། ། ས་བཤད་ ། ། ས་ན་ད ས་ ་ལ་ ད གས་པ་ ད་པ་ ང་ཙམ་ ད་ན་ ང་པས་ན་ ལ་ ་ད གས་ ་ འ ན་པ ་ ས་པ་ ་ད གས་པས་ན་ད གས་ ་ད གས་ ད་ག ་ ག་ལ། བ་པ་གནས་ ད་པ ་ ར་ ་ད གས་པ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་ བ མ་པར་ ། ། ་ཡང་ བས་ ་ ག་ ་བ མ་པ ་ད ས་ ་ ས་ འ ་ཀ་མ ་ ་ ས་ཐམས་ཅད་ལ་ ར་བར་ ག་པར་ ། ། ་ན་གལ་ ་འ ་ཁ་ ་ན་བ མ་ག ་གཞན་ ་མ་ ན་ནམ་ ་ན། ། ་ ལ་བ་ལ་ བས་ ད་ ། འ ་ཁ་ ས་པ་ ་ད ས་ ་དང་ ས་ལ་ ས་པར་ག ང་ བ་ ད་ ། ད ་མ་ བ་པ་ ན་ ་ལས། ་ ག་འ ར་ལ་གནས་ དང་ ས། །གང་འ ་ ད་པར་ངས་མ་མ ང་། ། ་བས་ ས་པ་ ་ན་ ནས། །འ ་བདག་ཁ་ན་གནས་པ་ ན། ། ས་ བ་ད ན་ ་ བ་ ས་ ག ངས་པ་དང་།

54

Could anyone at all be included in my retinue Who discriminates in terms of time, between

large and small,
Luminous and non-luminous,
With regard to the nature of things?
This nature, therefore, is luminous and empty...

In this way, as things are without reference point and empty merely by appearing, neither an object nor an apprehending mind is perceived. As there is thus no reality in either the object or subject of perception, one should cultivate well this lack of reference point.

The phrase, “at the time of death” should be attached to each of the objects of meditation described here.

One may then object, “Isn’t it that one should only meditate in this way at death, and not at other times?” There is no room for this objection: “the time of death” is not referring to any specific object or time. For as the master Nāgārjuna said in the Great Accomplishment of Mādhyamaka:

All places and times are impermanent, subject to change.

I have never seen anything that is not.
Thus, merely by being born
One is already in the jaws of the Lord of Death.

55

ནམ་ ག་སངས་ ས་མ་ག གས་པར། ། ་ ག་ལ་ གས་གནས་ པ་ ན། ། ས་པ་དང་། ཡང་ བ་ད ན་ ་ བ་ ས་རང་ལ་འ ་བ ་ ས་ ས་པ་ ད་པས་ཐར་པ ་ ན་ ་འབད་པ་ ་བ ན་འ ས་ ན་ ་ དང་ ན་པས་ ་ ས་ག ངས་པས་ན་འ ་ཁ་མ་ ས་ ལ་ ་ལ་ གདམས་པ ་མ ་ གས་ ་ད ་ཙམ་ ན་ ་ ས་ནས་འ ་ཁ་མ་ ན་ པ ་ ར་ ་ ས་འཆད་ ། །ཁ་ ག་ ་ ལ་བ་ལ་འ ད་པས་ བ་པ་ ཡང་ ང་ ། བ མ་པ་ལ་འ ་ཁར་བ མ་ལ་ཡང་ ག་པ་ ད་ ས་ འཆད་ ། །འ ་ ་ངན་ ་འ ་ཁ ་གནས་ བས་ན་ ག་བ ལ་ག ་ ར་བ་ལ་ གས་པས་གཟ ར་བ ་ བས་ ་ ང་ ་འ ན་ ་ ་བ་མད། ག་པ་ ་ལ་ གས་པ་ ། ། ་ ད་ག ན་པར་ལས་ བ་ནས། །འ ་ བ ་ ས་ ་དགའ་བས་འག ། ། ས་ག ངས་པས་ན་འ ་ཁ་མ་ ་ ས་ཙམ་ ད་ན་འ ་ཁ་མར་གནས་པ་ ན་ ་ ས་འཆད་པ་བཟང་ ་།། རང་ ་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ ང་པའམ། གནས་པ ་ ན་བཤད་ནས་ ་ ག་ ་ནང་ ་ ་ ་དང་ ར་ ས་ལ་ གས་པ་ལ་ཡང་ཆགས་པར་ ་ གས་ པར་ ན་པ་ །

56

And:

Eventually, everything aside from the buddha Is found to be impermanent.

Moreover, Ācārya Nāgārjuna has said that since the time of one’s death is uncertain, one should always be striving for liberation with great diligence. Thus, it is explained that “the time of death” and the situation described in the Rājādeśasūtra are merely illustrative examples, since as soon as one is born one is already facing death.

Some will object to this position, saying that these points are to be meditated on only at the moment of death since at that moment one will be free of other thoughts, but this is a poor interpretation. For at the time of death one is tormented by pain and suffering and so cannot give rise to samādhi. As it is said:

Having entered the great vehicle
And practiced for as long as one lives, At death one goes with joy.

Thus, the better explanation is that one is living in the moment of death from the very moment one is born.

Having explained how the actual state of things is empty of nature, the Buddha now sets out to show that it is not reasonable to be attached to outer and inner objects such as friends, relatives, and possessions. He

57

ད ས་ ་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ ག་པས་ན་ ་ལ་ཡང་ ་ཆགས་པ ་འ ་ ས་ རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ ་བ་ལ་ གས་པ་ག ངས་ ། ་ལ་ ད ས་ ་ ་ ར་བ ན་པར་ ང་བ་ཐམས་ཅད་དང་། ནང་ག ་བར་ ང་ བ་ ད་བ ད་ཐམས་ཅད་ ང་ ་ ག་ ། འ ས་ ས་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ ག་ པ། ། ས་པ་དང་། ད ས་ ་ལ་ གས་ ག་པར་ངས་མ་མ ང་། ། ་བས་ཆགས་པ ་ ་མ་འ ག ། ས་པ་དང་། བས་དང་ ར་ན་ད ་ མ་ གས་པ་བ ག་པ་ལས། གང་ལ་ཆགས་པ་ ་ ད་ ངས། ། ས་ ་ འ ང་བར་འ ར་པ ་ ར། ། ད་པར་ ་དང་ ་ ་ གས། ། ང་བ ་ ལ་ ་ ་བར་ གས། ། ས་བཤད་པས་ན། གནས་ བས་བ ་བས་ ན་ ་ལ་ཆགས་པ ་གནས་ ད་པས་ནམ་ཡང་ཆགས་པར་ ་ ་ ། ་གནས་ བས་ ་ ་ ག་པ ་ མ་པར་ ་ ་ ད་ལ་གནས་པས་ ་ བ་ ད་ ། ས་ན་ཆགས་པ་ ད་ ། ནང་ མས་ཅན་དང་། ་ ་ ད་ ལ་ཡང་ཆགས་པ་ ད་པར་ ་ ས་བ ན་པ ་ ན་ ། །

58

says: “Since all entities are impermanent, cultivate well a state of mind that is not attached to anything at all...”

Here, “entities” refers to all that appears as the inanimate external world, and to all the animate beings inside it—the vessel and its contents. All of this is impermanent. As it is said:

Everything conditioned is impermanent. And:

I do not see a single thing that is permanent. Therefore my mind is not attached.

And, as a quotation relevant to this context, it is said in the Mādhyamaka Treatise on the Analysis of Reasonings:

Abandon whatever you have attachment for
As it will only bind you.
In particular, it is better to regard
Sons, daughters, and so forth as something to be

given up.

Since circumstances will change, there is nothing to be attached to; thus one should never become attached. The truth of the matter is that all things are by their very nature impermanent; thus, there is really nothing to be done, and one should not become attached either

59

་ཡང་ ་རབ་འ ང་ ་ ་ ག་ ས་གཞན་ལ་བཏང་བ་ ་ད གས་ པས་ཟ ན་པ ་མ་ཆགས་པ་དང་། ད ས་ ་ལ་མ་ཆགས་ ང་ ་འ ད་ པ ་ ལ་ལ་ཆགས་པ་དང་མ་ཆགས་པ་འ ་ཡང་ད གས་ ད་ ་ ས་མ་ བས་པས་མ་ ལ་བ ་ ་ཅན་ག ས་ མ་པ་བ ན་ ་ལ་ ང་ བར་མཁས་པས་བཤད་པས་ན་འ ར་ ་ད ས་ ་ ལ་གང་ཟག་ཐམས་ ཅད་ལ་ ་ད གས་པས་ ས་རབ་དང་མ་ ལ་བར་གནས་བས་མ་ ཆགས་པ ་ག ་ འམ་མ ག་ ་ ན་པས་ན་ བས་ ན་ཡང་ ་ ན་ པར་ ག་པར་ ་ ས་བཤད་ ། ། ་ལས་གཞན་པ་བ ན་བ ས་ མ་ ག ས་ལ་ གས་པ ་རང་བ ན་ ་བཏང་བ་དང་ ན་པ ་ཆགས་པ་ ད་པ་མ་ ན་པ ་ ར་ན། བ་ད ན་ ་ བ་ ས། ཆགས་པ ་ ལ་ ལ་ད ས་ ད་པར། ། ་ལ་ཆགས་པ་ ་བ་ ། ། གས་སམ་གལ་ ་ ་ ང་ ། ། ་ལའང་ཆགས་པ་ ་བར་ གས། ། ས་ག ངས་པ་དང་ མ ན་པས་ན་ཆགས་པ་ ད་ ་ ་ ག་པར་གནས་པས་ ས་ བས་ ན་དང་ ར་ ། །

60

to inner sentient beings or to outer objects. This is the meaning of this passage.

Furthermore, it is said by the wise that one
may practice generosity infused with non-reference and therefore not be attached, or one may practice generosity while not being attached to things in general, but just to desirable objects in particular. This latter kind of generosity, although similar to non- attachment, is not sealed with non-reference.

These two types of non-attachment occur for those of highest and middling mental capacities respectively. Therefore, the most important and supreme type of non-attachment is to never be parted from the prajñā that does not grasp at any entity, object, or individual. This is also how one should understand the meaning of this passage.

Other types of non-attachment, such as those taught in the two treatises,5 are not the same as the non- attachment that is being taught here.

Ācārya Nāgārjuna says:

If it were reasonable to be attached
To objects of attachment that do not exist, Then it would also be reasonable
To be attached to the horns of a rabbit.

Reading this quotation alongside the current passage, we may understand it to be concerning

61

འ ་ ས་ ་ ་ལ་ཐབས་ ས་གནས་པས་ན་བ མ་པའམ་ ་ལ་ད ས་ ་ ་གནས་པས་ན་ ་ བ་པ་ བ་པ ་ ལ་ ་ ་ ས་བཤད་ ། ། བ ན་པ་དང་ ན་ ་ ་ གས་པས་འ ས་ ་འ ང་པ་ ་ ར་འ ར་ ཡང་ ་ ་ན་བ ན་འ ང་ངམ་ མ་ན་ ་ ག་དམ་པ ་ ན་ལ་ ་ ་ ང་ ། མས་ གས་ན་ ་ ས་ ན་པས་ན་སངས་ ས་གཞན་ ་བཙལ་ བ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ་པར་ ་ ས་ག ངས་ ། ་ད ས་ ་ ་ཉན་ ས་པ་དང་། མས་ཙམ་པ་དང་། ད ་མ་པ་ལ་ གས་པ ་ ་བ་དང་ བ ན་ན་ཡང་ མས་ཙམ་པ་ ན་པར་ ས་པ་ཁ་ ག་ ་ ད་པར་མ ན་ པས་ན་ ་ ་མ་ ན་ ། མས་ གས་ན་ ས་པ་ ་ ན་ ་ གས་པར་ ་བ ་ ་ ས་སམ་ མས་ ་གང་ཡང་ ད་པས་ན་ མས་ གས་ན་ ས་བཤད་པས་འ གས་པ ་ནའམ། ཡང་ན་ མས་ གས་ན་ ས་ པ་ ་ ས་ལ་ ང་བ ་ མས་ གས་ན་ ་ ་ན་ ་ ས་ ན་པས་ན་ ་ ས་ ན་པ ་ ས་འཆད་པས་ན་ཉན་ ས་ལ་ གས་པར་གནས་པ་ ད་ ། །

62

non-attachment due to the impermanent nature of things. It is explained that one should cultivate this state

of mind by skillful means, or alternatively, by training in the logical establishment of the characteristic of impermanence in all entities.

Results arise from collections of causes, the elements of cause and effect functioning as that which is depended upon and that which depends, respectively. Is it the case that wisdom arises in the same way? The answer to this is “No.” This is not how things are on the ultimate level. Thus, the Buddha says: “When the mind is realized, that itself is wisdom. Therefore, cultivate well the notion that buddha is not to be searched for elsewhere.”

Some may argue that, although the above statement can be interpreted in accordance with the views of
the Śrāvakas, Cittamātrins, Mādhyamikas and others,
it is evidently the Cittamātra position. This is not actually the case. In the phrase, “When the mind
is realized,” we may understand the word “when”
as carrying a sense of negation, in which case this statement is referring to the wisdom or mind that is to be realized, yet which does not exist in any way at all.
6 Alternatively, one could interpret “When the mind is realized, that itself is wisdom” as having the meaning: “When one realizes the mind that appears to wisdom, that in itself is wisdom.” Explained in this way, the

63

ས་ན་མ ་ ་ལས་ ང་། མས་ ད་ ་ནས་ ད་པ་ལ། ། ་ལ་ གས་ པ ་ ་ ་འ ག །མ་ གས་པ་ ་ ་ ས་ ན། ། ་ ས་ ་ ས་ ་ ན་ ད། ། ས་ག ངས་པ་ཡང་ ་མ ་ ངས་ ་འག ། །ད ན་ བ གས་ལས་ ང་། ད་ ངས་ མས་ ་ ངས་ ་བཙལ་ནས་ ་ ད་ ། །གང་ ་ ད་པ་ ་ ་ད གས་པ་ ན་པ ། །གང་ ་ད གས་ པ་ ་འདས་པའམ། ད་ ར་རམ། མ་ ངས་པ་མ་ ན་པས་ན། ས་ ་ ར་ག ངས་ ། །ཡང་ མས་གང་ ས་ ངས་ ་ གས་པ་ ་ ཡང་ ང་པ། ངས་ ་ གས་པ་ ་ཡང་ ང་པ་ ས་ ་བ་ལ་ གས་པ་ ག ངས་པས་ན་ད ས་ ་ གས་ ་ ད་པ་ ས་བཤད། ་ གས་པ་ ་ལ་ ་ ས་ ་ན་ ད་པ་ ས་ ་ ། སངས་ ས་གཞན་ནས་བཙལ་ ་མ་ ན་ ། བཙལ་ ་ ན་ན་ མས་ཅན་ཐ་དད་པ ་ ན་ཡང་གནས་ པ ་ ར་ ། ། ་བས་ན་གཞན་ན་བཙལ་ ་ ད་ ས་ ་བ་ གས་པ ་ མ ་ལས་ ང་། འ ་ཙམ་ ང་བ་ ག་པ་ལ། ། ་ ས་ ་ན་ ད་པ་ ན། །

64

statement is not referring to the śrāvakas or others. The following quotation from the sūtras is relevant to this point:

As mind itself is primordially non-existent,
The mind that realizes it does not engage with it. Such non-engagement is knowledge of it;
Such knowledge is supreme wisdom.

Also, in the Ratnakūṭa:

“Kāśyapa, when one looks for the mind, one does not find it. What is not found is not perceived, and since what is not perceived is not of the past, present, or future...”

And, just as it is said that the mind that realizes
is empty, that the realization itself is empty, and so
on, it is likewise explained that there is no entity to
be realized. The realization of this point is called “supreme wisdom.” The buddha is not to be searched for elsewhere, since, if there were something else to be searched for, the fault of buddha and sentient beings being separate and different would ensue. That there
is nothing to be searched for elsewhere is explained in
The Sūtra of Realization:

The subsidence of this notion Is the supreme wisdom.

65

་ ར་སངས་ ས་ ་ཙམ་ ག །གཞན་ ་བཙལ་ལམ་ད ས་འ ན་ ན། ། ་ལ་བཙལ་བར་ ་ ན་ ། ། གས་པ་ ་ ད་རང་ལ་ ན། ། ས་ག ངས་ ། ། ་བས་ན་ མ་པར་ ག་པ་ མས་པས་གནས་པས་ མ་ གས་པ་ ་ལ་ཐ་དད་པར་ གས་པ་ ་མཐའ་ག ས་མ་ ངས་པ ་ གང་ཟག་ ་ ས་པར་ ། ། ག་ ་ ་ཆ་དང་ ས་ ་ ན་ ང་བ ་རང་ བ ན་ལ། ག ས་པས་ ་ ན་ བ་དང་བ ན་ ། ། ་ ག་མས་ ་ ང་པ་དང་བ ན་ལ། ་ ག་མས་ ་ མ་པར་ ག་པ་དང་བ ན་ ། ། ་ ག་མས་ ་མཐར་ ག་ལ་ག ང་འ ན་ལ་ ་ད གས་པས་ན་ སངས་ ས་པ་ལ་ ས་དང་ ་ ་དང་།

66

Therefore, “buddha” is merely a word.
There is nothing to be searched for elsewhere,

nothing to be held as an entity, Nothing to be searched for in words. The realization itself is within you.

Therefore, understand that those who, through their habituation to concepts, have not gained this realization and thus view these phenomena as something separate, are individuals who have not abandoned the two extremes.

The first statement, “Since all phenomena are naturally pure, cultivate well the notion of lack of existence,” is referring to the nature of objects in their appearing mode.

The second, “Since all dharmas are contained within bodhicitta, cultivate well a mind of great compassion,” is spoken from the point of view of the relative level of reality.

The third, “Since all phenomena are naturally luminous, cultivate well a mind free of reference point,” is spoken from the point of view of emptiness.

The next, “Since all entities are impermanent, cultivate well a state of mind that is free of attachment to anything at all,” is said from a conceptual point of view.

The next, “When the mind is realized, that itself 67

་ ང་དང་བཟང་ངན་ ད་ ། ད ར་ན་མར་ ་མཛད་དང་ད་ ར་ག ་ མས་ཅན་ཐ་མལ་བ་ལ་ཡང་ ད་པར་ ད་པར་མཉམ་པ་ ད་ ་གནས་ པ་ ན་ ་ ས་ ་ ་ ད་ལ་གནས་པ ་ ན་བཤད་པ་ ན་ ས་མཁས་ པ་ཡན་ཆད་ག ངས་ལ། ་ ས་ ང་ ་ མས་པ་ ་བ་ ས་པ་འ ་ བ ད་པས་ཁ་ ག་ ག་པ་དང་དངངས་པ་ལ་ གས་པ ་ ལ་ཅན་འ ་ ་བ ན་པར་ ་བ་མ་ ན་ ། གསང་བ ་ ་དང་ ་ལས། གང་ལ་ ས་ ད་གནས་པ་ ། ། གས་པར་ གས་དང་ ་ལ་ ས། ། ་ལ་ ང་ ག་ ན་པར་ ། ། ་ལས་བཟ ག་ལ་ ་ ་ ན། ། ས་ག ངས་པས་ ་ ་དམ་པ ་ ན་ལ་གནས་པ ་ ས་འཆད་པར་འ ར་ ། ། ་བས་ ་དག་ ་བ ་བ ་ གས་ ་བཅད་པ་ ། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ གས་ ་བཅད་ ་བཀའ་ ལ་པ་ ས་ ་བ་ལ་ གས་པ་ནས་སངས་ ས་གཞན་ ་མ་ ལ་ག ་བར་ག ས་ ན་བ ས་ནས་ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ་ ལ་ ད་ག ང་བ ་ ར་ ་བ ར་བའམ། བ ན་པ ་ ལ་ ་བ ན་པ་ །

68

is wisdom. Therefore, cultivate well the notion
that buddha is not to be searched for elsewhere,

is an explanation of the essential nature of things. Ultimately, apprehended and apprehender are not found, and within the enlightened state there is no time, no earlier and later, no large and small, no
good and bad. For example, from the point of view
of this state, the previous buddha Dīpaṃkāra and all the ordinary beings of the present time in fact abide undifferentiated, in complete equality. The learned, at least, explain these matters in this way.

As for myself, I have understood them to a slight degree, and this expression of that understanding should not be taught to those who might become frightened, disturbed and so on by any of it. As is said in the first chapter of The Secret:

Some explanation of this may be given
To those who understand the nature of reality And have an interest in it.
It should not be taught to those who do not.

Thus it is explained that this teaching concerns the ultimate, the sublime meaning.

Then there are the verses that summarize the material, beginning with: “The Bhagavān then spoke the following verses...” and continuing until “Don’t search for buddha elsewhere!” The Buddha

69

་ ་བ ས་པ ་ ད་པར་ལས་ ན་ལ་ ད་པར་ ད་ ་ ས་འཆད་པས་ ན་ཡང་དག་པར་ གས་པ ་སངས་ ས་ ས་ག ངས་པ་དང་འ ར་ མས་དགའ་བ་ ས་པ་ ། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ ་ ད་ ས་བཀའ་ ལ་ནས་ ས་པ ། །འ ར་དགའ་བ་ ས་པ་ ་ ང་ བ་ མས་ དཔའ་ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ་དང་། ་ལ་ གས་པ ་འ ར་ ་མ་ ན་ ་བ ད་ལ་ གས་པ་ མས་ ་རང་ནས། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ ག ངས་པ་ལ་ ་རང་བར་ ར་ནས་བ ད་པ་ལ་ གས་པ་མཛད་ ་ ས་འཆད་ ། །བདག་འ ་ བ་ ར་གསལ་ ན་མ་ ན་ ང་། ། ན་ ལ་ ས་པ ་གང་ཟག་རང་བས་དམན་པ་དང་། ། ས་ ད་མ ང་ལ་ ག་པར་ ག་པ་ ་ ད་ ། ། ན་ ་བདག་ ས་ ས་པ་ ན། ། ་ལས་ ང་པ ་ད ་བ་ ས། །བདག་དང་མཐའ་ཡས་མ་ ག་པ། ། ་མ ན་ ས་རབ་ ས་འ མས་ ག ། ན་ལ་ ས་པ ་མཐའ་ག ས་ ད་པར་ ག །

70

repeats these topics so that Ākāśagarbha will be able
to remember their meaning. Apart from the fact that they are concise, these verses are no different in meaning from what has already been explained above. The sentence that reads “
The Bhagavān having said this...” conveys that the genuine, perfect Buddha thus spoke and that the retinue then rejoiced. As for the retinue rejoicing, it is explained that this consists of the bodhisattva Ākāśagarbha and the rest of the retinue— the gods, rākṣasas, the eight classes of gods and spirits and others—rejoicing in what the Bhagavān has taught and uttering praises and so forth.

Although someone like me has no brilliance with regards to composition,

I have written this for the sake of those lesser than myself

Who aspire to the true meaning,
And for the purpose of dispelling misconceptions

about the nature of reality.

By the virtue that comes from this,
May the ignorance—both my own and that of all

countless beings—
Be conquered by its antidote, prajñā!
May those aspiring to the true meaning be free of

the two extremes!
71

འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ་མ ་ ན་གསལ་བ་ ས་ ་བ། བ་ ད ན་ ་བ་ ས་མཛད་པ་ གས་ །། །། ་གར་ག ་མཁན་ ་ ་ ་ཛ་ དང་། ད་ ་ ་ ་བ་འཕགས་པ་ ས་རབ་ ས་བ ར་བ །། །།

72

This completes the Clarification of the Meaning of the Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra by Ācārya Śāntideva. It was translated by the Indian preceptor Dharmarāja and the Tibetan translator Pakpa Sherab.

73

74

The Sūtra Arranged for Chanting

75

76

༄༅། །འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ ་མ ་

བ གས་ །།

The Noble Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra

་གར་ ད་ ། རྻ་ཨ་ ་ཡ་ ་ན་ ་མ་མ ་ ་ན་ ་ ། ད་ ད་ །

འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ་ ག་པ་ ན་ ་མ །

gyagar ké du arya ata gnana nama mahayana sutra, böké du pakpa daka yeshé shyé jawa tekpa chenpo do

In the Indian language: Āryātyayajñānanāmamahāyān- asūtra. In the Tibetan language: pakpa daka yeshe shyé jawa tekpa chenpo do. In the English language: The Noble Mahāyāna Sūtra entitled Wisdom of the Time of Death.

སངས་ ས་དང་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ཐམས་ཅད་ལ་ ག་འཚལ་ ། །

sangye dang jangchub sempa tamché la chaktsal lo

Homage to all buddhas and bodhisattvas!

འ ་ ད་བདག་ ས་ ས་པ་ ས་ག ག་ན། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ག་ ན་ ་ ལ་ ་ཁང་བཟང་ན་བ གས་ ་འ ར་ཐམས་ཅད་ལ་ ས་ ན་པ་ དང་། ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ མས་དཔའ་ ན་ ་ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ས་

77

བ མ་ ན་འདས་ལ་ ག་འཚལ་ནས་འ ་ ད་ ས་ག ལ་ ། །

diké dak gi töpa dü chik na, chomdendé womin lha’i gyalpö khang zang na shyuk té, khor tamché la chö tönpa dang, jangchub sempa sempa chenpo namkhé nyingpö chomdendé la chak tsal né diké ché sol to

Thus I once heard. The Bhagavān was present in the palace of the king of the gods of Akaniṣṭa teaching the dharma to his retinue when the bodhisattva mahāsattva Ākāśagarbha prostrated to the Bhagavān and asked the following question:

བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ནམ་འ ་ཁ་མ ་ མས་ ་ ར་ བ ་བར་བག ། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་བཀའ་ ལ་པ། ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ་ ང་ བ་ མས་དཔའ་ནམ་འ ་བ ་ ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་བ མ་པར་ ། ། ་ལ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ་ ས་ཐམས་ཅད་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ མ་པར་ དག་པས་ན་ད ས་ ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ། ། ས་ཐམས་ཅད་ ང་ བ་ ་ མས་ ་འ ས་པས་ན་ ང་ ་ ན་ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ། ། ས་ཐམས་ཅད་རང་བ ན་ག ས་ ད་གསལ་ བས་ན་ ་ད གས་པ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ། །ད ས་ ་ ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ ག་པས་ན་ ་ལ་ཡང་ ་ཆགས་པ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་ པར་ ། ། མས་ གས་ན་ ་ ས་ ན་པས་ན་སངས་ ས་གཞན་ ་ ་ བཙལ་བ ་འ ་ ས་རབ་ ་བ མ་པར་ ། །

78

chomdendé jangchub sempa namchi kha mé sem jitar tawar gyi, chomdendé kyi katsal pa, namkhé nyingpo jangchub sempa namchi wé tsé daka yeshé gompar
ja o, dé la daka yeshé ni chö tamché rangshyin gyi nampar dakpé na, ngöpo mepé dushé rabtu gompar

ja o, chö tamché jangchub kyi sem su düpé na, nyingjé chenpö dushé rabtu gompar ja o, chö tamché rangshyin gyi ösalwé na, mimik pé dushé rabtu gompar ja o, ngöpo tamché mitakpé na, chi la yang mi chakpé dushé rabtu gompar ja o, sem tok na yeshe yinpé na, sangye shyendu mi tsalwé dushé rabtu gompar ja o

“Bhagavān, how should a bodhisattva regard the mind at the time of death?”

The Bhagavān then replied: “Ākāśagarbha, at the moment of death, the bodhisattva should train in the wisdom of the time of death. The wisdom of the time of death consists of the following: Since all phenomena are naturally pure, cultivate well the notion of lack

of existence. Since all dharmas are contained within bodhicitta, cultivate well a mind of great compassion. Since all phenomena are naturally luminous, cultivate well a mind free of reference point. Since all entities are impermanent, cultivate well a state of mind that

is not attached to anything at all. When the mind is realized, that itself is wisdom. Therefore, cultivate

79

well the notion that buddha is not to be searched for elsewhere.”

བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ གས་ ་བཅད་ ་བཀའ་ ལ་པ།

ས་ མས་རང་བ ན་ མ་དག་པས། །

ད ས་ ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། །

ང་ བ་ མས་དང་རབ་ ན་པས། །

ང་ ་ ན་ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། །

ས་ མས་རང་བ ན་ ད་གསལ་བས། །

ད གས་པ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། །

ད ས་ ་ཐམས་ཅད་ ་ ག་པས། །

ཆགས་པ་ ད་པ ་འ ་ ས་བ མ། །

མས་ ་ ་ ས་འ ང་བ ་ ། །

སངས་ ས་གཞན་ ་མ་ ལ་ ག །

chomdendé kyi tsik su ché dé katsal pa, chö nam rangshyin namdakpé, ngöpo mepé dushé gom, jangchub sem dang rab denpé, nyingjé chenpö dushé gom, chö nam rangshyin ösalwé, mikpa mepé dushé gom, ngöpo tamché mitakpé, chakpa mepé dushé gom, sem ni yeshe jungwé gyu, sangye shyendu ma tsol chik

80

The Bhagavān then spoke the following verses:

“Since phenomena are by nature pure, Cultivate the notion of lack of existence. Since they are infused with bodhicitta, Cultivate a mind of great compassion. Since everything is naturally luminous, Cultivate a mind free of reference point. Since all entities are impermanent, Cultivate a state of mind that is free of

attachment.
Mind is the cause for the arising of wisdom; Don’t search for buddha elsewhere!”

བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ ་ ད་ ས་བཀའ་ ལ་པ་དང་། ང་ བ་ མས་ དཔའ་ནམ་མཁ ་ ང་ ་ལ་ གས་པ ་འ ར་འ ས་པ་ཐམས་ཅད་རབ་ ་ དགའ་མ ་ ་རངས་ནས། བ མ་ ན་འདས་ ས་ག ངས་པ་ལ་མ ན་ པར་བ ད་ ། །

chomdendé kyi deké ché katsal pa dang, jangchub sempa namkhé nyingpo lasokpé khor düpa tamché rabtu gagu yirang né, chomdendé kyi sungpa la ngönpar tö do

The Bhagavān having said this, the bodhisattva Ākāśagarbha and all those gathered in the retinue rejoiced with delight and praised the Bhagavān’s

81

teaching.

འཕགས་པ་འདའ་ཀ་ ་ ས་ ས་ ་བ་ ག་པ་ ན་ ་མ ་ གས་ །།

།།མ ་ལཾ།།

pakpa daka yeshé shyé jawa tekpa chenpö do dzok so, mangalam

This completes the noble Mahāyāna Sūtra entitled Wisdom of the Time of Death. Auspiciousness!

82

83

84

Endnotes

A Commentary on the Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra, by Prajñāsamudra

1. This is a reference to an Indian convention of identifying certain elements of a treatise at the beginning of a commentary on it. Generally, these elements consist of:

  1. The subject matter (Skt. abhidheya, Tib. brjod bya)

  2. The means of expression (Skt. abhidhāna, Tib. rjod

    byed)

  3. The purpose (Skt. prayojana, Tib. dgos pa)

  4. The ultimate purpose (Skt. prayojananiṣṭhā, Tib.

    dgos pa mthar phyin pa)

  5. The connection (this is either the connection

    between the previous elements or the origin of the treatise.) (Skt. saṃbandha, Tib. ‘brel pa)

2. The Buddhist sūtras were originally maintained orally before they were written down. At councils of the saṅgha, one or more monks, called saṅgītikāras (Tib. sdud pa
po
) would recite sūtras in their entirety, including the
phrase “Thus I have heard at one time.” It seems that Prajñāsamudra is here explaining that the reciter would include this phrase in order to show that he was a saṅgītikāra and had learned and memorized other texts.

3. This quotation from the Laṅkāvatārasūtra explains that the sambhogakāya buddhas reside and attain enlightenment in Akaniṣṭa, whereas the nirmāṇakāya buddhas reside and

85

attain enlightenment on earth.

4. Tib. chos zab mo la bzod pa, Skt. gambhīradharmakṣānti. This refers to realization of emptiness.

5. The Tibetan root text reads de la here; there is no real English equivalent for this expression, and its meaning is so subtle that we decided to leave it out of the translation of the root text. Prajñāsamudra’s commentary on this phrase is typical of the technical style of Sanskrit commentaries, in which the significance of words and phrases is explained in minute detail.

6. phyi rol don du smra ba: lit. those who assert the existence of external objects.

A Commentary on the Wisdom of the Time of Death Sūtra, by Śāntideva

1. This refers to the four parts of this sentence: “Thus”, “I”, “once”, and “heard.” These four words may be interpreted as signifying the authenticity of the sūtra.

2. According to ancient Indian tradition, to be called bhagavān one must possess the following six qualities: 1) dominion, 2) courage or strength, 3) fame, 4) fortune, 5) wisdom, and 6) the absence of worldly desires.

3. The Tibetan root text reads de la here; there is no real English equivalent for this expression, and its meaning is so subtle that we decided to leave it out of the translation of the root text. Śāntideva’s commentary on this phrase is typical of the technical style of Sanskrit commentaries, in which the

86

significance of words and phrases are explained in minute detail.

4. This is an explanation of the Sanskrit word dharma, which in this case is being derived from the verb dhṛ which means “to bear, to carry.”

5. This could refer to the Vaibhāṣhika and Sautrāntika tenet systems.

6. bgegs pa’i na is referring to the Sanskrit grammatical construction that the translators have translated into Tibetan as na. This lends this line two possible meanings. We have translated both.

87

88

This twenty-six syllable mantra is from the Root Mañjuśrī Tantra. When it is placed inside texts, it prevents negative karma from being accrued by stepping on or over them.

89

90

For further publications by Lhasey Lotsawa, please visit: www.lhaseylotsawa.org

91